Explore Human Diversity

The Department of Anthropology at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa emphasizes an integrated approach to social science and humanistic study, using diverse methods that include archaeological, biological, and cultural analysis. Our focus on human diversity promotes global learning and cross-cultural understanding. We are committed to forms of critical inquiry, advocacy, and community engagement that recognize the value of local and regional pasts and contemporary perspectives in a globalizing world, and to developing knowledge of, and for, communities in Hawai'i, Oceania, and Asia.


This map of Australia shows the 21 places where Aboriginal peoples have memories of times, at least 7,000 years ago, when sea level was lower than it is today. https://t.co/VyNYDLLBng

Nobody had seen the sickness before. It swept through the refugee camp, and as people died the rumours grew. The answer to their questions lay not in the present, but in the past. https://t.co/AeaXvwtTH3

Global recognition of #antibiotic #resistant bugs grows; what does the #UN suggest to stop it? #globalhealth

https://t.co/jYbVs03tLa

"Disposability highlights how things design us. Disposability involves distinct economic practices ... Disposable objects and the ability to constantly discard go together." By Gay Hawkins #disposability #discardstudies

Disposability

by Gay Hawkins ‘Disposable’ usually describes minor ephemeral things from take-away coffee cups to plastic bags. More recently, it has bee...

discardstudies.com

Commentary by #archaeologist Gabriel D. Wrobel, associate professor, Michigan State University: Trophies made from human skulls hint at regional conflicts around the time of Maya civilization's declne via @ConversationUS

Trophies made from human skulls hint at regional conflicts around the time of Maya civilization's mysterious collapse

Grisly war trophies made from the heads of vanquished enemies certainly grab attention. But archaeologists are more interested in what they may tell a...

theconversation.com

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